ANALYSIS OF TOTAL NET ALLOCATIONS

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ANALYSIS OF TOTAL NET ALLOCATIONS TO FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

(JUNE 1999 DECEMBER 2005)

 

 

 

August 7, 2006

 

Period

States/FCT

LG/Area Councils

States+ LG

Federal Government

Total Fed+State+LG

 

Naira

Naira

Naira

Naira

Naira

1999

(June-Dec)

89,719,045,266.40

41,936,047,771.84

131,655,093,038.24

154,633,681,796.66

286,288,774, 834.90

2000

348,291,513,603.64

167,160,070,675.77

515,451,584,279.41

531,612,593,116.78

1,047,064,179,396.19

2001

465,401,088,573.91

197,546.513.263.92

662,947,601,837.83

723,920,377,511.08

1,189,321,665, 633.71

2002

441,784,920,342.94

321,324,219,934.24

763,109,140,277,18

791,030,594,492,.65

1,554,139,736, 771.83

2003

557,887,744,033.24

396,799,689,065.92

954,687,433,099.18

739,208,155,737.65

1,693,895,590, 839.81

2004

808,724,985,148.82

515,717,202,778.65

1,324,442,187,927.47

967,244,620,894.38

2,291,686,810,825.85

2005

1,087,071,135,553.04

608,410,059,002.91

1,695,481,194,555.95

1,229,871,999,841.18

2,925,353,196, 402.13

TOTAL

3,798,880,432,522 .99

2,248,893,802,493.25

6,048,774,235,015.24

5,137,522,023,390.38

11,185,296,258,406.62

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Period

States+ LG

Federal Government

Total Fed+State+LG

Oil Revenue

(Gross)

Oil Revenue

(Net)

Total

Revenue

(Gross)

 

  Naira

Naira

Naira

Million Naira

Million

Naira

Million

Naira

1999

(June-Dec)*

131,655,093,038.24

154,633,681,796.66

286,288,774, 834.90

369.4

175.3

474.6

2000

515,451,584,279.41

531,612,593,116.78

1,047,064,179,396.19

1,591.7

857.6

1,906.2

2001

662,947,601,837.83

723,920,377,511.08

1,189,321,665, 633.71

1,707.6

903.4

2,231.6

2002

763,109,140,277,18

791,030,594,492,.65

1,554,139,736, 771.83

1,230.9

1,105.1

1,731.8

2003

954,687,433,099.18

739,208,155,737.65

1,693,895,590, 839.81

2,074.3

1,510.8

2,575.1

2004

1,324,442,187,927.47

967,244,620,894.38

2,291,686,810,825.85

3,354.8

2,091.5

3,920.5

2005

1,695,481,194,555.95

1,229,871,999,841.18

2,925,353,196, 402.13

4,762.4

2,248.8

5,547.5

TOTAL

6,048,774,235,015.24

5,137,522,023,390.38

11,185,296,258,406.62

15,091.1

8,892.5

18,387.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*The oil revenues quoted are exactly half of the 1999 figures reported in Central Bank reports

 

Source:  Quoted in FMF's "Detailed Breakdown of Allocation to Federal, State and Local Governments June 1999 December 2005:   Transparency in Action Series #3"

 

Total Net Allocation: Net Statutory Allocation + Crude Oil Excess Proceeds/Additional Allocations + Value Added Tax (VAT)

 
 
 
Re-compiled by NigerianMuse.com
Bolaji Aluko
August 2006

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
 
ANALYSIS OF NET ALLOCATIONS TO STATE, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS & FCT
(JUNE 1999 DECEMBER 2005)

 

 

 

S/N

STATE

TOTAL

STATE

TOTAL

LGS

GRAND TOTAL

 

 

Naira

Naira

Naira

 

South-West

 

 

 

1

EKITI

61,471,039,353.49

40,614,417,476.80

102,085,456, 830.29

2

OGUN

79,385,487,772.67

55,039,721,378.91

134,425,209, 151.58

3

OSUN

73,951,258,132.74

69,564,281,945.46

143,515,540, 078.20

4

ONDO

115,556,011,557.22

49,700,726,087.89

165,256,737, 645.11

5

OYO

94,561,616,448.77

85,738,160,960.60

180,299,777, 409.37

6

LAGOS

125,600,302,169.44

101,056,041,405.89

226,656,343, 575.33

 

TOTAL SW

550,525,715, 434.32

401,713,349, 255.55

952,239,064, 689.87

 

 

 

 

 

 

South-East

 

 

 

7

EBONYI

67,033,789,158.75

35,191,121,374.78

102,224,910, 533.53

8

ENUGU

70,696,694,334.74

46,351,440,047.05

117,048,134, 381.79

9

ABIA

76,003,369,531.87

44,631,769,412.43

120,635,138, 944.30

10

ANAMBRA

72,339,555,669.28

57,833,544,665.88

130,173,100, 335.16

11

IMO

88,329,267,960.25

67,210,136,062.87

155,539,404, 023.12

 

TOTAL SE

374,402,676, 654.89

251,218,011, 563.01

625,620,688, 217.90

 

 

 

 

 

 

South-South

 

 

 

12

CROSS RIVER

75,472,543,725.49

51,283,884,129.16

126,756,427, 854.65

13

EDO

78,591,632,874.37

52,947,882,293.02

131,539,515, 167.39

14

BAYELSA

259,882,240,857.63

25,754,253,465.88

285,636,494, 323.51

15

AKWA-IBOM

238,005,666,755.08

75,568,971,474.28

313,574,638, 229.36

16

RIVERS

286,395,088,148.55

71,110,954,311.22

357,506,042, 459.77

17

DELTA

321,002,165,222.70

66,429,551,574.99

387,431,716, 797.69

 

TOTAL

1,259,349,337, 583.84

343,095,497, 248.55

1,602,444,834,832.37

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North-West

 

 

 

18

ZAMFARA

77,338,862,735.94

48,322,637,449.77

125,661,500, 185.71

19

KEBBI

75,263,506,042.87

59,420,023,463.01

134,683,529, 505.88

20

SOKOTO

80,036,311,326.12

65,999,305,835.52

146,035,617, 161.64

21

JIGAWA

77,918,168,752.71

73,936,519,372.93

151,854,688, 125.64

22

KADUNA

96,803,171,357.52

80,613,129,016.84

177,416,300, 374.36

23

KATSINA

96,824,546,272.58

96,085,544,646.68

192,910,090, 919.26

24

KANO

123,494,358,469.44

130,893,716,443.54

254,388,074, 912.98

 

TOTAL

627,678,924, 957.20

555,270,876, 228.29

1,182,949,801,185.47

 

 

 

 

 

 

North-East

 

 

 

25

GOMBE

65,594,071,585.36

34,044,777,855.38

99,638,849, 440.74

26

TARABA

69,696,696,206.16

49,325,837,307.73

119,022,533, 513.89

27

YOBE

72,056,990,075.83

49,809,737,485.52

121,866,727, 561.35

28

ADAMAWA

76,279,738,465.84

60,634,604,114.02

136,914,342, 579.86

29

BAUCHI

87,925,626,452.89

58,279,780,193.49

146,205,406, 646.38

30

BORNO

86,641,612,017.52

78,920,597,345.85

165,562,209, 363.37

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

458,194,734, 803.58

331,015,334, 301.99

789,210,069, 105.57

 

 

 

 

 

 

North-Central

 

 

 

31

NASSARAWA

60,967,863,159.39

35,762,267,245.39

96,730,130, 404.78

32

PLATEAU

52,530,884,206.82

49,423,852,213.97

101,954,736, 420.79

33

KWARA

67,835,223,414.64

44,667,750,273.22

112,502,973, 687.86

34

KOGI

74,044,273,130.82

58,274,691,157.64

132,318,964, 288.46

35

BENUE

82,304,822,807.21

68,831,500,210.60

151,136,323, 017.81

36

NIGER

87,755,390,162.29

76,769,758,516.34

164,525,148, 678.63

 

TOTAL

        425,438,456,881.20

333,729,819, 617.16

759,168,276, 498.36

 

 

 

 

 

37

FCT ABUJA

103,290,586,206.97

32,850,914,278.75

136,141,500, 485.72

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OVERALL SUMMARY

 

 

 

 

SE

374,402,676, 654.89

251,218,011, 563.01

625,620,688, 217.90

 

NC

425,438,456, 881.20

333,729,819, 617.16

759,168,276, 498.36

 

NE

458,194,734, 803.58

331,015,334, 301.99

789,210,069, 105.57

 

SW

550,525,715, 434.32

401,713,349, 255.55

952,239,064, 689.87

 

NW

627,678,924, 957.20

555,270,876, 228.29

1,182,949,801,185.49

 

SS

1,259,349,337, 583.84

343,095,497, 248.55

1,602,444,834,832.39

 

FCT

103,290,586,206.96

32,850,914,278.75

136,141,500, 485.71

 

GRAND TOTAL

3,798,880,432,521.99

2,248,893,802, 493.30

6,047,774,235,015.29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

 

 

5,137,522,023,390.38

 

OVERALL TOTAL

 

 

11,185,296,258,405.67

 
 
Source:  Federal Ministry of Finance publication
 
 
RE-COMPILED BY NIGERIAN MUSE......
Bolaji Aluko
August 2006
 
 
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
 
 
THIS DAY
 

 

States Share N673bn Windfall

From Collins Edomaruse in Abuja, 08.09.2006
 

 

July 2006 Allocation

Thirty-six states of the Federation and the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, collectively smiled home in the month of July when they pocketed a whopping N673.324 billion as their share of statutory allocation and excess crude earnings' distribution for the period.
 
This was revealed in a document from the office of the Accountant-General of the Federation titled: "Distribu-tion of Statutory Allocation (July 06) and Excess Crude Proceeds to the three tiers of government in July 2006", a copy of which THISDAY got yesterday.
 
The report showed that five of the states: Rivers, Bayelsa, Delta, Akwa Ibom and Kano, catapulted themselves to the two-digits wrung with each carting home between N10 billion and N25 billion.
 
Leading the pack, Rivers state got a grand total of N25,883 billion which is made up of N10.138 billion from 13 per cent derivation, N12.803 billion from excess crude, N1.39billion from statutory allocation and another N1.5 billion excess crude for local governments in the state.
 
Similarly, Bayelsa received N7.97 billion from the 13 per cent derivation account as well as N10 billion from excess crude account. The state also had its accounts credited to the tune of N538 million for its councils and another N597.7 million excess crude for the same councils in the state. In total, the state smiled home with a whooping grand total of N19,197,410,863.92.
In the same vein, Delta State which garnered a total of N18.622 billion, had its share broken down thus: 13 per cent derivation N6.977 billion; excess crude N8.734 billion; statutory allocation for local governments N1.379 billion and excess crude distribution to the councils N1.531 billion.
 
The fourth highest beneficiary and another oil producing state of the Niger Delta, Akwa Ibom, has its breakdown as follows:  statutory allocation N6.458 billion; excess crude distribution N8.065 billion; statutory allocations for state's councils N1.569 billion while the excess crude account for councils was credited with a whopping N1.738 billion. In total, the state got N17,831,804,082.85.
 
The only non-oil producing state that garnered over N10 billion was Kano. It got N10.776 billion and was distributed as follows: statutory allocation N2.44 billion; excess crude N2.7 billion; statutory allocation for its 44 councils, N2.669 billion and excess crude to same accounted for N2.959 billion.
 
Conversely, the FCT, Gombe, Ebonyi, Nasarawa and Ekiti States went home with the least allocations of between N673.3 million and N4 billion.
 
While the document further showed that the FCT got its accounts credited to the tune of N673.324 million, Gombe State became richer with N4.435 billion lumped into its accounts.
Similarly, Nasarawa and Ekiti States received N4.508 billion and N4.732 billion respectively.
 
Other states which also got huge amounts from the distribution include Ondo with N9,060,035,806.15; Lagos N8,299,806,965.06; Kaduna N7,654,995,396.83; Imo N7,366,417,410.84; Borno N7,276,602, 098.96; Niger N7,151,791,231.47; Jigawa N7,048,660,361.35.

 

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


 
THIS DAY
 

...For N/Delta Governors, A Golden Opportunity to Make a Difference

By Max Amuche, 08.09.2006
 

 

News Review

How can a people be so blessed yet still live in extreme want? Put differently, how can a person live in the midst of water and still wash his hands with spittle?


This 'paradox of plenty' hit Nigerians last week when the Federal Government released to the 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), their shares from the Federation Account and Excess Crude. 
 

Although the states have all been quiet about the jumbo sums collected, THISDAY checks at the Office of the Accountant-General reveal  they all shared a total of N673 billion which is rather instructive. The July allocations raise compelling questions and put some governors on the spotlight.
 

Using the Niger Delta states as examples, from May 1999 to December 2005, Akwa Ibom received a total of N238,005,666,755.85. Bayelsa State received N259,882,240,857.63 within the same period. For Delta State, it was N321,002,165, 222.71 while Rivers State got N286,395,088,148.56 within the six-year period.
 

This means that these four states, collectively, collected more than N1 trillion between June 1999 and December 2005, about one third of the entire allocation to the 36 states and the FCT within the same period. While the entire allocation for the period for all the states and Abuja was about N3.79 trillion, these four states of the Niger Delta collected about N1.25 trillion.
 

Given the state of affairs in the Niger Delta today, with the spate of kidnapping and violence, the July jumbo sums, given the key states within the zone, can make a lot of difference in addressing poverty issues that most often lead to criminality, if properly applied.
 

The almost one billion dollars that the four principal states (River, Bayelsa, Delta and Akwa Ibom) collected in only one month can indeed provide infrastructure, create jobs, improve health, education and help with small scale industries for the people of the region.
 

While the problems of the region are many and would require a major intervention from all the stakeholders, there are still a lot that the governors could do with the resources now available to them.
 

It must, however, be stated that the Niger Delta states are not being singled out for indictment. They are entitled to whatever they have collected and the 13 per cent derivation from the Federation Account is the reason why they get more money than many other states of the federation. If some of them have failed to deliver democracy dividends to their people, other state governments are no less guilty. The idea is to bring home this poverty in the midst of plenty.
 

Where has all the money gone? That is the logical question that follows or should follow. All indices or parameters of development still put Nigeria at the bottom of the development matrix, in fact, behind less endowed countries in Africa, even countries we have always bailed out both in cash and kind, countries that we claim leadership over.
 

 From East to West, North to South, with very few exceptions, you can  hardly see what has been done with more than three trillion naira in six years. There is massive unemployment, roads are mere death traps, and atotal breakdown of infrastructure etc.
 

Then the Niger Delta. The UNDP report on the social situation in the Niger Delta released recently painted a grim picture of life in that part of the country which has been in international limelight   for sometime now.
 

The Niger Delta Development Report has drawn attention to the contradiction of mass poverty persisting in the face of stupendous oil wealth in this region. For instance, the region may fail to meet the targets in the Millennium Development Goals except in the area of school enrolment by the target date of 2015. The authors of the report say it "recommends a new paradigm of development to address concerns "such as 'disillusionment, frustration among the people about their increasing deprivation and deep-rooted mistrust"
 

The elements of this new paradigm are listed in the report as a seven-point development agenda namely promotion of peace as condition for development; making local governance responsive to people's needs; economic development; promotion of social inclusion, ensuring a sustainable environment for socio-economic reproduction; adoption of an integrated approach to the scourge of HIV-AIDS and building an enduring partnership for the advancement of human development.
 

According to the report: "Behind the Niger Delta's poor performance on human development is a complex brew of economic, social, political and environmental factors. Social instability, poor local governance, competition for economic resources and environmental degradation have taken a toll.
 

"The general neglect of infrastructure, often rationalised by the difficulty of the Delta's terrain, has worsened people's access to fundamental services such as electricity, safe drinking water, roads and health facilities that are taken for granted in many other parts of Nigeria. Other elements include the negative impacts of the oil industry, a constricted land area, a delicately balanced environment and extreme economic deprivation."
 

With the resources currently  in their hands, the governors of Rivers, Bayelsa, Akwa Ibom and Delta States can make a world of difference in the lives of their people assuming they have the will.

 

 

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